Raleigh Mustang Elite gets 4/5 from Road CC

Raleigh Mustang Elite gets 4/5 from Road CC

It’s really a very good bike this – and don’t let the whole gravel thing put you off, this is simply a good road bike for steady rides and commuting.

If you’re put off the idea of a road bike with skinny tyres (and they can be a bit intimidating to newer cyclists) and want a bit of added comfort and security on the UK’s crumbling road network, the Mustang Elite might be a good choice for you.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - top tube decal.jpg

The gravel bike category has emerged from the US with plenty of hype, it’s fair to say, but it has resulted in a new breed of road bikes that are well suited to cyclists who value comfort and assured handling over the outright speed and whippy handling of a conventional race bike.

What’s it for?

The Mustang Elite does everything a regular road bike does, but it does it with the added comfort of the big tyres. The tyres, provided you run them at a suitably low pressure (I recommend about 65psi), give the Mustang Elite a very stable ride character. It isn’t easily knocked off line and it doesn’t jiggle you about on a rough road surface.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - fork clearance.jpg

If you’re not concerned with top speeds and chasing segments on Strava, preferring to spend most of your time at a comfortable cruising speed, the Mustang Elite doesn’t feel laborious. It may not have the outright acceleration of a lighter race bike, and its weight does stunt initial movement at lower speed, but here’s the thing: it’s not a bike designed for sprinting and riding everywhere as fast as you possibly can. It’s intended for allowing you to enjoy cycling as a form of escape and adventure, for taking in the sights and enjoying the freedom and simplicity of getting around with just a jam sandwich powering the engine, rather than glory through suffering and all that nonsense.

For many cyclists, it’s all you really need. It’s right at home on the commute, with the frame accepting mudguards and a rear rack if you need or want them. It’s fine on the weekend club ride and for sneaking in a couple of steady hours on a Sunday morning before lunch. Unless you really need the low weight and speed of a conventional race-inspired road bike, the Raleigh Mustang might actually be a more suitable choice.

But will it go off-road?

Why yes, it will. It won’t rival a cyclo-cross or mountain bike on really tricky and muddy terrain, but for adding a gravelled track such as a canal towpath, a byway or countryside bridleway into your route, the Mustang Elite copes just fine.

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There are surprisingly good levels of traction to be gained from the dimpled tread pattern of these new Schwalbe G-One tyres. Just enough grip to stop the wheels slithering about uncontrollably when it gets a bit slick underneath the tyre. Run them at lower pressures and they allow you to explore the sort of countryside terrain that would rapidly intimidate a road bike with skinny tyres.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - seat stay clearance.jpg

Best of all, this grip off-road doesn’t come at the expense of performance and speed on the hard stuff. They whizz along just fine. And they really do whizz – they make an unmistakable sound at higher speeds that’ll have you looking over your shoulder until you get used to it. They’re a robust tyre as well, and they’re tubeless-ready if you ever want to ditch the inner tubes at a future date. It’s a smart tyre choice by Raleigh.

Even if you never plan to go near any off-road trails, the Mustang Elite is just fine as a 100 per cent road bike. Many of the roads where I live are rapidly regressing to the Roman roads they once were. Dodging potholes, piles of rocks and loose stones can be a tedious experience on a narrow-tyre race bike. But with the Mustang Elite, you don’t have to be so precious and delicate about line choice.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - riding 2.jpg

How does it handle?

The Mustang Elite shares its geometry (the angles and lengths of the various tubes that make up the frameset) with the more expensive carbon fibre Roker. The slack head angle, low bottom bracket and long wheelbase provide the Mustang with fantastic handling; it’s a breeze to ride, anyone will jump aboard and instantly feel at home with the handling.

The 71-degree head angle is slacker than a conventional road bike, and the bottom bracket drop is 75mm, which compares to 69-70mm on a road bike. Those numbers instil the Mustang Elite with the sort of stable and easy handling that is lacking in many road bikes.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - frame detail.jpg

Don’t get me wrong, I love tearing around on a fancy race bike, but the Mustang won me over every time I rode it. It does nothing untoward or erratic, no matter how hard you push it. It’s just an easy and comfortable bike to ride.

Steering response is good, with a tolerable level of feedback from the carbon fibre fork with its tapered head tube. There are oversize thru-axles at both wheels which help to resist flex through the frame and fork. You can detect this most noticeably on out of the saddle climbs: there’s no brake rub at all. The thru-axles also make it easier to align the disc rotors when fitting the wheels – handy for travelling.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - front hub.jpg

I detected more road feedback through the aluminium frame compared with the carbon frame of the Roker. Basically, these two models have identical equipment and geometry, it’s just the frame material that is different. The carbon Roker does provide a measurably smoother ride. Perhaps not enough to warrant the extra £1,000 if you’re on a tight budget, though. and the Mustang is certainly not uncomfortable.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - seat post detail.jpg

Where they do measurably differ is on the scales. The Mustang Elite is 1.5kg heavier than its more expensive sibling, and you do notice this on the climbs. But really, you’ll only notice this if you ride the Roker Pro and then jump immediately onto the Mustang Elite and ride up a 20% climb. And you’re highly unlikely to be doing that. Most of the time the weight isn’t a factor, and the wide-range SRAM gearing ensures you’ve got enough gears to winch up any climb.

Does the SRAM Rival 1 drivetrain work?

Yes, very well. SRAM’s single-ring drivetrain was born in the mountain bike world and it’s made a smooth transition onto gravel and cyclo-cross bikes, where the slightly reduced gearing is less of a bother than it is on top-flight race bikes. Some of the jumps on the huge 10-42t cassette can be a bit troublesome, but most of the time you find a suitable gear, and sit and spin away. The majority of the time I found I was in the right gear, so SRAM has clearly thought carefully about what ratios to offer.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - drive train.jpg

The 44t chainring sounds small compared with a 53t chainring, but with the 10-tooth sprocket there’s more than enough top-end speed for most. Basically, you have to be going like the clappers to really run out of gears, and if you’re doing that on a regular basis, then you can easily swap the chainring for a bigger one. Or find some hills.

How well does it stop?

It stops very well, thanks to the TRP Hy/Rd hydraulic brakes. They’re a fully self-contained design, so they’re compatible with regular cable-pull brake levers. The power and feel is not quite as good as a proper hydraulic setup like you get with Shimano or SRAM’s hydro disc groupsets, but it’s a step above other mechanical disc brakes.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - rear disc detail.jpg

Disc brakes have found a natural home on bikes like this, because of the control of the extra braking performance, and also because they allow the frame and fork to accommodate wider tyres. There’s also plenty of clearance between the frame and tyres for mudguards or mud.

I like tubeless. Can I convert the wheels?

Raleigh has fitted the bike with its own-brand RSP AD3.0 wheels which feature an aluminium rim that is tubeless-ready. Also tubeless-ready are the Schwalbe tyres, so to convert to tubeless it’s just a matter of removing the inner tubes, fitting the supplied tubeless valve, adding some sealant, and tubeless you go.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - rim.jpg

Anything else?

The Raleigh RSP branded aluminium handlebar, stem and seatpost aren’t anything fancy but they do the job just fine. The handlebar has a nice shape with a compact drop which makes it usable when riding off-road when you need a bit more control. More of a flared drop would increase off-road control even more.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - bars.jpg

The bike has all the necessary eyelets to accommodate mudguards and it’ll take a rear rack, plus there are two sets of bottle cage mounts.

Raleigh Mustang Elite - cable route 3.jpg

What of its rivals?

This is a competitive price point and the gravel bike category is getting more popular all the time. The Mustang Elite has to fend off competition from the excellent GT Grade Alloy 105(link is external), which costs the same and also features an aluminium frame and wide tyres, and even the same TRP hydraulic disc brakes. Both offer a very similar riding experience and both provide mudguard and rack fittings if those are important to you. For me, the Mustang Elite pips the GT Grade because of the tubeless-ready wheels and tyres, and the simpler SRAM Rival 1 drivetrain.

The Mustang, with the same frame, is also available at £650 with a Shimano Claris groupset, and the Mustang Sport, at £800, has Shimano Sora parts. Those two models feature regular double chainsets and mechanical disc brakes. The Mustang range tops out with the £1,500 Comp, which upgrades to a SRAM Rival 1 hydraulic groupset and American Classic wheels.

Verdict

The Mustang Elite is affordable, adaptable and accessible – a good buy for the money

 

InfoCrank

infocrank-compact-m30-centered

InfoCrank makes cyclists happy – here’s why

You ride with two legs, so measure both!

With InfoCrank, you can now measure directly at the source where you apply torque to the cranks. Riders like Robbie McEwen could only have wished for dual sided cycling power meters for sale in their day, but we aren’t all Green Jersey winners, so why should we care about Left and Right?

We believe in measuring direct Left and Right because power is the key metric to improving your cycling. When cycling with a power meter that is accurate, you get more of the right data so that you can solve imbalances and make real gains.

Improve today with reliable and accurate Left / Right power meter

Weatherproof

You need a power meter for your bike that works every day, no matter where the adventure may take you. InfoCrank is IPX7 rated, meaning you could ride it submerged in a stream without any water ingress issues. You’ll get a perfect stream of data in all sorts of crazy conditions.

 

Temperature steady

Temperature affects strain gauges and messes with the readings. Other spider, hub or crank based power meters use algorithms to compensate for these errors. But InfoCrank was built specifically to eliminate problems without relying on complex calculations. Every data point from InfoCrank is completely accurate and true, making it the best power meter for a road bike.

 

Super durable

Cycling pushes us to our limits, and we need our tools to go the distance with us. InfoCrank has all its electronics protected inside a high grade alloy crankset, making training with a power meter a breeze. What’s different about InfoCrank? It just works. Only every time. Scroll down this page to read our cycling power meter reviews.

Certified accurate

InfoCrank is the most accurate cycling watt meter. But you’ve heard that from every other bicycle power meter on the market, right? +/- 1% or +/- 2% doesn’t sound like a lot, but it’s a bit deeper than that. Unlike any other power meter, we have proven our accuracy through external certification to validate our claims. And, because InfoCrank doesn’t drift, it’s always as accurate as promised.

 

On any bike

Power meter cycling training will be seamless with an InfoCrank. In fact, there is no difference between the watts measured on one set of InfoCranks and another*. If you switch the InfoCrank between bikes, or you have one on each bike, the watts measured on both are the same watts. Accurate for the whole ride, every day.

*Lab tests during production have shown that each bike crankset is within 0.5% on average.

 

No data drift

Accuracy claims don’t usually take into consideration drift over time when cycle training with a power meter. Drift is when the power meter data is inaccurate due to temperature changes affecting the strain gauges. It can happen in one day, or over the course of a week or month. Power meters usually resolve this issue by re-zeroing before a ride, but that just indicates that the accuracy of your last ride had drifted. It was no longer accurate as claimed. Our new cycling power meters resolve drift by design and require no re-zeroing to keep the data accurate.

Available to Order or Purchase at Romney Cycles Kent Ltd

Cost £1149.00

Includes:

  • Crank arms
  • Praxis Chainrings
  • Praxis bottom bracket
  • Fitting kit, Ant Dongle and tools

Key Features:

  • Left and Right power meter crankset
  • Compact 110mm BCD spider
  • Stiff M30 axle
  • ANT+
  • Weight 694 grams
  • IPX7 waterproof

Choose your specification of  Chainrings currently 50-34 0r 36-52, Crank Lengths 170mm, 172.5mm 0r 175mm. Choice of Bottom Brackets BB30/PF30, BSA, BB86, OS

See links for more details

http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2015/11/verve-infocrank-review.html

https://www.vervecycling.com/why-infocrank/

MERIDA SCULTURA 6000 HAS BEEN AWARDED LIGHTWEIGHT BIKE OF THE YEAR BY CYCLING WEEKLY.

Merida Scultura 6000

MERIDA ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THAT THE NEW MERIDA SCULTURA 6000 HAS BEEN AWARDED LIGHTWEIGHT BIKE OF THE YEAR BY CYCLING WEEKLY.

Merida Scultura 6000

Journalist Oliver Woodman attended the launch of the Scultura Team at the start of the Giro D’Italia.

He loved the bike and commented that Juergen, our R&D chief, was refreshingly honest about the Scultura’s attributes (apparently many brands gush incessantly over the most minor details when little has changed).

When Oliver visited our Nottingham showroom, he recommended we should enter the Scultura 6000 for the bike of the year. At that stage he had done the “man maths”; phenomenal frame + Ultegra + Fulcrum wheels + stellar price = winning package.

As you’ll see, they benefited from double exposure as the Scultura, along with Oliver, were the stars of the preview video that Cycling Weekly produced (click link below to view). The video was viewed 20,000 times in its first 24 hours.

https://www.facebook.com/CyclingWeekly/videos/10153272293652634/

Introducing a New Points Reward Scheme At Romney Cycles online Store

Introducing a New Points Reward Scheme at Romney Cycles online store.

New Points Reward Scheme works like this. You can earn points as you spend to put towards your next order.

So every pound you spend you earn 1 point and every 10 points equals to the value of £1.00 of your next purchase online.

You can save your points and use them against  future purchases or just use them as you go or part use the choice is yours!

For example Spend £50.00 you earn 50 points which is equals £5.00 to use on future orders.

You need to register as a online customer to collect points.

When you redeem your points some products are limited to how many points you can use these mainly apply to products that have been reduced for example Sale and clearance products.

T and C’S Apply:

Points can only be earned through purchasing online, and currently only used online.

Points cannot get redeemed against Any Cycle Scheme.

Any questions or enquiries please don’t hesitate to contact us…

http://www.romneycycles.co.uk/

Merida One Twenty XT-Edition 2016 Mountain Bike

Merida One Twenty XT-Edition 2016 Mountain Bike

Merida One Twenty XT-Edition 2016 Mountain Bike £1900.00

Frame 6066 Triple butted and hydroformed frameset with smooth welding, internal cable routing and tapered head tube. Floating rear shock.142x12mm rear through axle and 120mm travel
Forks Rock Shox Sektor Gold, 130mm travel, Remote lockout, 15mm bolt through, tapered steerer
Rear Shock Fox Float DPS Performance
Headset Big Conoid semi neck
Handlebars Merida Pro oversize clamp – 740mm wide – 12mm rise
Stem Merida Pro – oversize clamp – 5 degree
Shifters 22 Speed Shimano XT-ispec
Front Mech Shimano XT
Rear Mech Shimano XT Shadow+
Chainset Shimano XT 36-26
Bottom Bracket Shimano XT
Chain KMC X11
Cassette Shimano XT 11-40
Front Brake Shimano M615 hydraulic disc brakes – 180mm rotors
Rear Brake Shimano M615 hydraulic disc brakes – 180mm rotors
Rims SunRingle Helix TR
Front Hub Formula Centerlock-15mm front
Rear Hub Formula Centerlock- 12mm rear
Spokes Black stainless
Tyres Schwalbe Nobi Nic 2.25" PSC FrontSchwalbe Nobi Nic 2.25" PSC Rear
Seatpost Merida Pro – in line 31.6mm
Pedals XC Pro alloy

Review: Santini Tempo Long Sleeve Jersey

Review: Santini Tempo Long Sleeve Jersey

Review: Santini Tempo Long Sleeve Jersey

Review: Santini Tempo Long Sleeve Jersey. A stylish long-sleeved jersey, offering great value and performance at a very sensible price – a real alternative to logo madness!

Performance 8/10 Looks 10/10 Value 9/10 Overall 9/10

 

It seems that with the British weather being so inclement that nowadays there is never a bad time to buy clothes that will be worn through all 3 (4?) seasons.

I’ve been wearing the Santini Tempo Jersey of late, to be honest I didn’t envisage it getting much use this time of year but as it happens I have been wearing it most days!

blue

Worn as an outer layer, with just a simple base underneath it provides enough insulation to cope adequately with mild days, keeping you comfy down to the 4’s and 5’s area if the wind isn’t playing up.

It has very little in the way of wind resistance, so you will lose the heat quite rapidly, but for a high-tempo ride it does the job nicely.

Having worn it through several spring showers I can attest to its ability to keep the water off your skin, it will eventually soak through, but the Thermofleece fabric means you should be safe for some time – and it will cope with the brief showers that we are having, for longer more prolonged periods you will definitely be wanting to take out the rain coat from one of the 3 elasticated rear pockets.

One of the things that I did like about the Tempo jersey was using it as a mid-layer when the temps did drop – early mornings etc

On the colder mornings when I had a windproof top on as well the Tempo did a great job of keeping the core body at just the right temperature – the fleece doing a grand job of regulating the heat as needed.

Aesthetically its a lovely piece of kit, I was wearing the Royal Blue version, and with just a nod towards reflectivity it’s a very classy looking top indeed.

I would go far as to say it’s probably my wife’s favourite looking top of mine, it’s cut close, but not too – and it doesn’t scream out euro fashion explosion (which to me is a good thing)

Retailing at £69.99  it’s an excellent item to have in your wardrobe, although it won’t be spending much time there as it will be called into use very frequently!

http://www.romneycycles.co.uk/product/santini-tempo-long-sleeve-jersey/

Now in a Sale £62.99

 

Lake Cycling Shoes